[[man_de_mail]]

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 +==== Manuel de la commande "​mail"​ ====
 +
 +<​code>​
 +MAIL(1) ​                                               BSD General Commands Manual ​                                              ​MAIL(1)
 +
 +NAME
 +     mail, mailx, Mail — send and receive mail
 +
 +SYNOPSIS
 +     mail [-dEIinv] [-a header] [-b bcc-addr] [-c cc-addr] [-s subject] to-addr ...
 +     mail [-dEIiNnv] -f [file]
 +     mail [-dEIiNnv] [-u user]
 +
 +DESCRIPTION
 +     mail is an intelligent mail processing system which has a command syntax reminiscent of ed(1) with lines replaced by messages.
 +
 +     The options are as follows:
 +
 +     ​-a ​     Specify additional header fields on the command line such as "​X-Loop:​ foo@bar"​ etc.  You have to use quotes if the string
 +             ​contains spaces. ​ This argument may be specified more than once, the headers will then be concatenated.
 +
 +     -b bcc-addr
 +             Send blind carbon copies to bcc-addr.
 +
 +     -c cc-addr
 +             Send carbon copies to list of users. ​ cc-addr should be a comma separated list of names.
 +
 +     ​-d ​     Causes mail to output all sorts of information useful for debugging mail.
 +
 +     ​-E ​     Don't send messages with an empty body.
 +
 +     ​-f ​     Use an alternate mailbox. ​ Defaults to the user's mbox if no file is specified. ​ When quit, mail writes undeleted messages
 +             back to this file.
 +
 +     ​-I ​     Forces mail to run in interactive mode, even when input is not a terminal. ​ In particular, the special ~ command character,
 +             used when sending mail, is only available interactively.
 +
 +     ​-i ​     Ignore tty interrupt signals. ​ This is particularly useful when using mail on noisy phone lines.
 +
 +     ​-N ​     Inhibits initial display of message headers when reading mail or editing a mail folder.
 +
 +     ​-n ​     Inhibits reading /​etc/​mail.rc upon startup.
 +
 +     -s subject
 +             ​Specify subject on command line (only the first argument after the -s flag is used as a subject; be careful to quote sub‐
 +             jects containing spaces).
 +
 +     -u user
 +             ​Equivalent to:
 +
 +                   $ mail -f /​var/​mail/​user
 +
 +             ​except that locking is done.
 +
 +     ​-v ​     Verbose mode.  The details of delivery are displayed on the user's terminal.
 +
 +   ​Startup actions
 +     At startup time, mail will execute commands in the system command file, /​etc/​mail.rc,​ unless explicitly told not to by using the -n
 +     ​option. ​ Next, the commands in the user's personal command file ~/.mailrc are executed. ​ mail then examines its command line
 +     ​options to determine whether the user requested a new message to be sent or existing messages in a mailbox to be examined.
 +
 +   ​Sending mail
 +     To send a message to one or more people, mail can be invoked with arguments which are the names of people to whom the mail will be
 +     ​sent. ​ You are then expected to type in your message, followed by a control-D (‘^D’) at the beginning of a line.  The section
 +     ​below,​ Replying to or originating mail, describes some features of mail available to help you compose your letter.
 +
 +   ​Reading mail
 +     In normal usage, mail is given no arguments and checks your mail out of the post office, then prints out a one line header of each
 +     ​message found. ​ The current message is initially set to the first message (numbered 1) and can be printed using the print command
 +     ​(which can be abbreviated p).  Moving among the messages is much like moving between lines in ed(1); you may use + and - to shift
 +     ​forwards and backwards, or simply enter a message number to move directly.
 +
 +   ​Disposing of mail
 +     After examining a message you can delete (d) or reply (r) to it.  Deletion causes the mail program to forget about the message.
 +     This is not irreversible;​ the message can be undeleted (u) by giving its number, or the mail session can be aborted by giving the
 +     exit (x) command. ​ Deleted messages, however, will usually disappear, never to be seen again.
 +
 +   ​Specifying messages
 +     ​Commands such as print and delete can be given a list of message numbers as arguments to apply to a number of messages at once.
 +     Thus delete 1 2 deletes messages 1 and 2, while delete 1-5 deletes messages 1 through 5.
 +
 +     ​Messages may also be selected using one of the following categories:
 +
 +           ​* ​      all messages
 +           ​$ ​      last message
 +           :​d ​     deleted messages
 +           :​n ​     new messages
 +           :​o ​     old messages
 +           :​r ​     read messages
 +           :​u ​     unread messages
 +
 +     Thus the command top, which prints the first few lines of a message, could be used in top * to print the first few lines of all
 +     ​messages.
 +
 +   ​Replying to or originating mail
 +     You can use the reply command to set up a response to a message, sending it back to the person who it was from.  Text you then type
 +     in, up to an end-of-file,​ defines the contents of the message. ​ While you are composing a message, mail treats lines beginning with
 +     the tilde (‘~’) character specially. ​ For instance, typing ~m (alone on a line) will place a copy of the current message into the
 +     ​response,​ right shifting it by a single tab-stop (see the indentprefix variable, below). ​ Other escapes will set up subject fields,
 +     add and delete recipients to the message, and allow you to escape to an editor to revise the message or to a shell to run some com‐
 +     ​mands. ​ (These options are given in the summary below.)
 +
 +   ​Ending a mail processing session
 +     You can end a mail session with the quit (q) command. ​ Messages which have been examined go to your mbox file unless they have been
 +     ​deleted,​ in which case they are discarded. ​ Unexamined messages go back to the post office (see the -f option above).
 +
 +   ​Personal and system wide distribution lists
 +     It is also possible to create personal distribution lists so that, for instance, you can send mail to “cohorts” and have it go to a
 +     group of people. ​ Such lists can be defined by placing a line like
 +
 +           alias cohorts bill ozalp jkf mark kridle@ucbcory
 +
 +     in the file .mailrc in your home directory. ​ The current list of such aliases can be displayed with the alias command in mail.
 +     ​System wide distribution lists can be created by editing /​etc/​aliases,​ (see aliases(5));​ these are kept in a different syntax. ​ In
 +     mail you send, personal aliases will be expanded in mail sent to others so that they will be able to reply to the recipients. ​ Sys‐
 +     tem wide aliases are not expanded when the mail is sent, but any reply returned to the machine will have the system wide alias
 +     ​expanded as all mail goes through an MTA.
 +
 +   ​Recipient address specifications
 +     ​Recipient addresses (any of the “To”, “Cc” or “Bcc” header fields) are subject to expansion when the expandaddr option is set.
 +
 +     An address may be expanded as follows:
 +
 +     ​· ​      An address that starts with a pipe (‘|’) character is treated as a command to run.  The command immediately following the
 +             ​‘|’ is executed with the message as its standard input.
 +
 +     ​· ​      An address that starts with a ‘+’ character is treated as a folder.
 +
 +     ​· ​      An address that contains a ‘/’ character but no ‘!’, ‘%’, or ‘@’ characters is also treated as a folder.
 +
 +     ​· ​      If none of the above apply, the recipient is treated as a local or network mail address.
 +
 +     If the expandaddr option is not set (the default), no expansion is performed and the recipient is treated as a local or network
 +     mail address.
 +
 +   ​Network mail (ARPA, UUCP, Berknet)
 +     See mailaddr(7) for a description of network addresses.
 +
 +     mail has a number of options which can be set in the .mailrc file to alter its behavior; thus set askcc enables the askcc feature.
 +     ​(These options are summarized below.)
 +
 +SUMMARY
 +     ​(Adapted from the “Mail Reference Manual”.)
 +
 +     Each command is typed on a line by itself, and may take arguments following the command word.  The command need not be typed in its
 +     ​entirety -- the first command which matches the typed prefix is used.  For commands which take message lists as arguments, if no
 +     ​message list is given, then the next message forward which satisfies the command'​s requirements is used.  If there are no messages
 +     ​forward of the current message, the search proceeds backwards, and if there are no good messages at all, mail types “No applicable
 +     ​messages” and aborts the command.
 +
 +     ​- ​      Print out the preceding message. ​ If given a numeric argument n, goes to the nth previous message and prints it.
 +
 +     ? ​      ​Prints a brief summary of commands.
 +
 +     ​! ​      ​Executes the shell (see sh(1) and csh(1)) command which follows.
 +
 +     ​alias ​  (a) With no arguments, prints out all currently defined aliases. ​ With one argument, prints out that alias. ​ With more than
 +             one argument, creates a new alias or changes an old one.
 +
 +     ​alternates
 +             (alt) The alternates command is useful if you have accounts on several machines. ​ It can be used to inform mail that the
 +             ​listed addresses are really you.  When you reply to messages, mail will not send a copy of the message to any of the
 +             ​addresses listed on the alternates list.  If the alternates command is given with no argument, the current set of alternate
 +             names is displayed.
 +
 +     ​chdir ​  (c) Changes the user's working directory to that specified, if given. ​ If no directory is given, then changes to the user's
 +             login directory.
 +
 +     ​copy ​   (co) The copy command does the same thing that save does, except that it does not mark the messages it is used on for dele‐
 +             tion when you quit.
 +
 +     ​delete ​ (d) Takes a list of messages as argument and marks them all as deleted. ​ Deleted messages will not be saved in mbox, nor
 +             will they be available for most other commands.
 +
 +     ​dp ​     (also dt) Deletes the current message and prints the next message. ​ If there is no next message, mail says “No more
 +             ​messages.”
 +
 +     ​edit ​   (e) Takes a list of messages and points the text editor at each one in turn.  On return from the editor, the message is
 +             read back in.
 +
 +     ​exit ​   (ex or x) Effects an immediate return to the shell without modifying the user's system mailbox, his mbox file, or his edit
 +             file in -f.
 +
 +     ​file ​   (fi) The same as folder.
 +
 +     ​folder ​ (fo) The folder command switches to a new mail file or folder. ​ With no arguments, it tells you which file you are cur‐
 +             ​rently reading. ​ If you give it an argument, it will write out changes (such as deletions) you have made in the current
 +             file and read in the new file.  Some special conventions are recognized for the name.  # means the previous file, % means
 +             your system mailbox, %user means user's system mailbox, & means your mbox file, and +folder means a file in your folder
 +             ​directory.
 +
 +     ​folders
 +             List the names of the folders in your folder directory.
 +
 +     ​from ​   (f) Takes a list of messages and prints their message headers.
 +
 +     ​headers
 +             (h) Lists the current windowful of headers. ​ To view the next or previous group of headers, see the z command.
 +
 +     ​help ​   A synonym for ?.
 +
 +     ​hold ​   (ho, also preserve) Takes a message list and marks each message therein to be saved in the user's system mailbox instead of
 +             in mbox.  Does not override the delete command.
 +
 +     ​ignore ​ Add the list of header fields named to the ignored list.  Header fields in the ignore list are not printed on your terminal
 +             when you print a message. ​ This command is very handy for suppression of certain machine-generated header fields. ​ The Type
 +             and Print commands can be used to print a message in its entirety, including ignored fields. ​ If ignore is executed with no
 +             ​arguments,​ it lists the current set of ignored fields.
 +
 +     ​inc ​    ​Incorporate any new messages that have arrived while mail is being read.  The new messages are added to the end of the mes‐
 +             sage list, and the current message is reset to be the first new mail message. ​ This does not renumber the existing message
 +             list, nor does it cause any changes made so far to be saved.
 +
 +     ​list ​   (l) List the valid mail commands.
 +
 +     ​mail ​   (m) Takes as argument login names and distribution group names and sends mail to those people.
 +
 +     ​mbox ​   Indicate that a list of messages be sent to mbox in your home directory when you quit.  This is the default action for mes‐
 +             sages if you do not have the hold option set.
 +
 +     ​more ​   (mo) Takes a message list and invokes the pager on that list.
 +
 +     ​next ​   (n) (like + or CR) Goes to the next message in sequence and types it.  With an argument list, types the next matching mes‐
 +             sage.
 +
 +     ​preserve
 +             (pre) A synonym for hold.
 +
 +     ​Print ​  (P) Like print but also prints out ignored header fields. ​ See also print, ignore, and retain.
 +
 +     ​print ​  (p) Takes a message list and types out each message on the user's terminal.
 +
 +     ​quit ​   (q) Terminates the session, saving all undeleted, unsaved messages in the user's mbox file in his login directory, preserv‐
 +             ing all messages marked with hold or preserve or never referenced in his system mailbox, and removing all other messages
 +             from his system mailbox. ​ If new mail has arrived during the session, the message “You have new mail” is given. ​ If given
 +             while editing a mailbox file with the -f flag, then the edit file is rewritten. ​ A return to the shell is effected, unless
 +             the rewrite of edit file fails, in which case the user can escape with the exit command.
 +
 +     ​Reply ​  (R) Reply to originator. ​ Does not reply to other recipients of the original message.
 +
 +     ​reply ​  (r) Takes a message list and sends mail to the sender and all recipients of the specified message. ​ The default message
 +             must not be deleted.
 +
 +     ​respond
 +             A synonym for reply.
 +
 +     ​retain ​ Add the list of header fields named to the retained list.  Only the header fields in the retain list are shown on your ter‐
 +             minal when you print a message. ​ All other header fields are suppressed. ​ The Type and Print commands can be used to print
 +             a message in its entirety. ​ If retain is executed with no arguments, it lists the current set of retained fields.
 +
 +     ​save ​   (s) Takes a message list and a filename and appends each message in turn to the end of the file.  The filename in quotes,
 +             ​followed by the line count and character count is echoed on the user's terminal.
 +
 +     ​saveignore
 +             ​saveignore is to save what ignore is to print and type.  Header fields thus marked are filtered out when saving a message
 +             by save or when automatically saving to mbox.
 +
 +     ​saveretain
 +             ​saveretain is to save what retain is to print and type.  Header fields thus marked are the only ones saved with a message
 +             when saving by save or when automatically saving to mbox.  saveretain overrides saveignore.
 +
 +     ​set ​    (se) With no arguments, prints all variable values. ​ Otherwise, sets option. ​ Arguments are of the form option=value (no
 +             space before or after =) or option. ​ Quotation marks may be placed around any part of the assignment statement to quote
 +             ​blanks or tabs, i.e., set indentprefix="​->"​.
 +
 +     ​shell ​  (sh) Invokes an interactive version of the shell.
 +
 +     ​size ​   Takes a message list and prints out the size in characters of each message.
 +
 +     ​source ​ The source command reads commands from a file.
 +
 +     ​top ​    Takes a message list and prints the top few lines of each.  The number of lines printed is controlled by the variable
 +             ​toplines and defaults to five.
 +
 +     ​Type ​   (T) Identical to the Print command.
 +
 +     ​type ​   (t) A synonym for print.
 +
 +     ​unalias
 +             Takes a list of names defined by alias commands and discards the remembered groups of users. ​ The group names no longer
 +             have any significance.
 +
 +     ​undelete
 +             (u) Takes a message list and marks each message as not being deleted.
 +
 +     ​unread ​ (U) Takes a message list and marks each message as not having been read.
 +
 +     ​unset ​  Takes a list of option names and discards their remembered values; the inverse of set.
 +
 +     ​visual ​ (v) Takes a message list and invokes the display editor on each message.
 +
 +     ​write ​  (w) Similar to save, except that only the message body (without the header) is saved. ​ Extremely useful for such tasks as
 +             ​sending and receiving source program text over the message system.
 +
 +     ​xit ​    (x) A synonym for exit.
 +
 +     ​z ​      mail presents message headers in windowfuls as described under the headers command. ​ You can move mail's attention forward
 +             to the next window with the z command. ​ Also, you can move to the previous window by using z-.
 +
 +   ​Tilde/​escapes
 +     Here is a summary of the tilde escapes, which are used when composing messages to perform special functions. ​ Tilde escapes are
 +     only recognized at the beginning of lines. ​ The name “tilde escape” is somewhat of a misnomer since the actual escape character can
 +     be set by the option escape.
 +
 +     ​~bname ...
 +             Add the given names to the list of carbon copy recipients but do not make the names visible in the Cc: line ("​blind"​ carbon
 +             ​copy).
 +
 +     ​~cname ...
 +             Add the given names to the list of carbon copy recipients.
 +
 +     ​~d ​     Read the file dead.letter from your home directory into the message.
 +
 +     ​~e ​     Invoke the text editor on the message collected so far.  After the editing session is finished, you may continue appending
 +             text to the message.
 +
 +     ​~Fmessages
 +             ​Identical to ~f, except all message headers are included.
 +
 +     ​~fmessages
 +             Read the named messages into the message being sent.  If no messages are specified, read in the current message. ​ Message
 +             ​headers currently being ignored (by the ignore or retain command) are not included.
 +
 +     ​~h ​     Edit the message header fields by typing each one in turn and allowing the user to append text to the end or modify the
 +             field by using the current terminal erase and kill characters.
 +
 +     ​~Mmessages
 +             ​Identical to ~m, except all message headers are included.
 +
 +     ​~mmessages
 +             Read the named messages into the message being sent, indented by a tab or by the value of indentprefix. ​ If no messages are
 +             ​specified,​ read the current message. ​ Message headers currently being ignored (by the ignore or retain command) are not
 +             ​included.
 +
 +     ​~p ​     Print out the message collected so far, prefaced by the message header fields.
 +
 +     ​~q ​     Abort the message being sent, copying the message to dead.letter in your home directory if save is set.
 +     ​~Rstring
 +             Use string as the Reply-To field.
 +
 +     ​~rfilename
 +     ​~<​filename
 +             Read the named file into the message.
 +
 +     ​~sstring
 +             Cause the named string to become the current subject field.
 +
 +     ​~tname ...
 +             Add the given names to the direct recipient list.
 +
 +     ​~v ​     Invoke an alternate editor (defined by the VISUAL option) on the message collected so far.  Usually, the alternate editor
 +             will be a screen editor. ​ After you quit the editor, you may resume appending text to the end of your message.
 +
 +     ​~wfilename
 +             Write the message onto the named file.
 +
 +     ​~x ​     Abort the message being sent.  No message is copied to ~/​dead.letter,​ even if save is set.
 +
 +     ​~? ​     Prints a brief summary of tilde escapes.
 +
 +     ​~!command
 +             ​Execute the indicated shell command, then return to the message.
 +
 +     ​~|command
 +             Pipe the message through the command as a filter. ​ If the command gives no output or terminates abnormally, retain the
 +             ​original text of the message. ​ The command fmt(1) is often used as command to rejustify the message.
 +
 +     ​~:​mail-command
 +     ​~_mail-command
 +             ​Execute the given mail command. ​ Not all commands, however, are allowed.
 +
 +     ​~~string
 +             ​Insert the string of text in the message prefaced by a single ~.  If you have changed the escape character, then you should
 +             ​double that character in order to send it.
 +
 +     ​~. ​     Simulate end of file on input.
 +
 +   Mail options
 +     ​Options are controlled via set and unset commands. ​ Options may be either binary, in which case it is only significant to see
 +     ​whether they are set or not; or string, in which case the actual value is of interest. ​ The binary options include the following:
 +
 +     ​append ​ Causes messages saved in mbox to be appended to the end rather than prepended. ​ This should always be set (perhaps in
 +             /​etc/​mail.rc).
 +
 +     ask, asksub
 +             ​Causes mail to prompt you for the subject of each message you send.  If you respond with simply a newline, no subject field
 +             will be sent.
 +
 +     ​askbcc ​ Causes you to be prompted for additional blind carbon copy recipients at the end of each message. ​ Responding with a new‐
 +             line indicates your satisfaction with the current list.
 +
 +     ​askcc ​  ​Causes you to be prompted for additional carbon copy recipients at the end of each message. ​ Responding with a newline
 +             ​indicates your satisfaction with the current list.
 +
 +     ​autoinc
 +             ​Causes new mail to be automatically incorporated when it arrives. ​ Setting this is similar to issuing the inc command at
 +             each prompt, except that the current message is not reset when new mail arrives.
 +
 +     ​autoprint
 +             ​Causes the delete command to behave like dp; thus, after deleting a message, the next one will be typed automatically.
 +
 +     ​debug ​  ​Setting the binary option debug is the same as specifying -d on the command line and causes mail to output all sorts of
 +             ​information useful for debugging mail.
 +
 +     ​dot ​    The binary option dot causes mail to interpret a period alone on a line as the terminator of a message you are sending.
 +
 +     ​expandaddr
 +             ​Causes mail to expand message recipient addresses, as explained in the section Recipient address specifications.
 +
 +     ​hold ​   This option is used to hold messages in the system mailbox by default.
 +
 +     ​ignore ​ Causes interrupt signals from your terminal to be ignored and echoed as @'s.
 +
 +     ​ignoreeof
 +             An option related to dot is ignoreeof which makes mail refuse to accept a control-D as the end of a message. ​ ignoreeof
 +             also applies to mail command mode.
 +
 +     ​keep ​   Setting this option causes mail to truncate your system mailbox instead of deleting it when it's empty.
 +
 +     ​keepsave
 +             ​Messages saved with the save command are not normally saved in mbox at quit time.  Use this option to retain those mes‐
 +             ​sages.
 +
 +     ​metoo ​  ​Usually,​ when a group is expanded that contains the sender, the sender is removed from the expansion. ​ Setting this option
 +             ​causes the sender to be included in the group.
 +
 +     ​noheader
 +             ​Setting the option noheader is the same as giving the -N flag on the command line.
 +
 +     ​nosave ​ Normally, when you abort a message with two interrupt characters (usually control-C), mail copies the partial letter to the
 +             file dead.letter in your home directory. ​ Setting the binary option nosave prevents this.
 +
 +     ​quiet ​  ​Suppresses the printing of the version when first invoked.
 +
 +     ​Replyall
 +             ​Reverses the sense of reply and Reply commands.
 +
 +     ​searchheaders
 +             If this option is set, then a message-list specifier in the form “/x:y” will expand to all messages containing the sub‐
 +             ​string ‘y’ in the header field ‘x’. ​ The string search is case insensitive. ​ If ‘x’ is omitted, it will default to the
 +             ​“Subject” header field. ​ The form “/to:y” is a special case, and will expand to all messages containing the substring ‘y’
 +             in the “To”, “Cc” or “Bcc” header fields. ​ The check for “to” is case sensitive, so that “/To:y” can be used to limit the
 +             ​search for ‘y’ to just the “To:” field.
 +
 +     ​skipempty
 +             ​Don'​t send messages with an empty body.
 +
 +     ​verbose
 +             ​Setting the option verbose is the same as using the -v flag on the command line.  When mail runs in verbose mode, the
 +             ​actual delivery of messages is displayed on the user's terminal.
 +
 +   ​Option string values
 +     ​EDITOR ​       Pathname of the text editor to use in the edit command and ~e escape. ​ If not defined, /usr/bin/ex is used.
 +
 +     ​LISTER ​       Pathname of the directory lister to use in the folders command. ​ Default is /bin/ls.
 +
 +     ​MBOX ​         The name of the mbox file.  It can be the name of a folder. ​ The default is “mbox” in the user's home directory.
 +
 +     ​PAGER ​        ​Pathname of the program to use in the more command or when the crt variable is set.  The default paginator more(1) is
 +                   used if this option is not defined.
 +
 +     ​REPLYTO ​      If set, will be used to initialize the Reply-To field for outgoing messages.
 +
 +     ​SHELL ​        ​Pathname of the shell to use in the ! command and the ~! escape. ​ A default shell is used if this option is not
 +                   ​defined.
 +
 +     ​TMPDIR ​       Directory in which temporary files are stored.
 +
 +     ​VISUAL ​       Pathname of the text editor to use in the visual command and ~v escape. ​ If not defined, /usr/bin/vi is used.
 +
 +     ​crt ​          The valued option crt is used as a threshold to determine how long a message must be before PAGER is used to read it.
 +                   If crt is set without a value, then the height of the terminal screen stored in the system is used to compute the
 +                   ​threshold (see stty(1)).
 +
 +     ​escape ​       If defined, the first character of this option gives the character to use in the place of ~ to denote escapes.
 +
 +     ​folder ​       The name of the directory to use for storing folders of messages. ​ If this name begins with a ‘/’, mail considers it
 +                   to be an absolute pathname; otherwise, the folder directory is found relative to your home directory.
 +
 +     ​indentprefix ​ String used by the ~m tilde escape for indenting messages, in place of the normal tab character (‘^I’). ​ Be sure to
 +                   quote the value if it contains spaces or tabs.
 +
 +     ​record ​       If defined, gives the pathname of the file used to record all outgoing mail.  If not defined, then outgoing mail is
 +                   not so saved.
 +
 +     ​screen ​       Size of window of message headers for z.
 +
 +     ​sendmail ​     Pathname to an alternative mail delivery system.
 +
 +     ​toplines ​     If defined, gives the number of lines of a message to be printed out with the top command; normally, the first five
 +                   lines are printed.
 +
 +ENVIRONMENT
 +     mail utilizes the HOME, LOGNAME, USER, SHELL, DEAD, PAGER, LISTER, EDITOR, VISUAL, REPLYTO, MAIL, MAILRC, and MBOX environment
 +     ​variables.
 +
 +     If the MAIL environment variable is set, its value is used as the path to the user's mail spool.
 +
 +FILES
 +     /​var/​mail/​* ​                     post office (unless overridden by the MAIL environment variable)
 +     ​~/​mbox ​                          ​user'​s old mail
 +     ​~/​.mailrc ​                       file giving initial mail commands; can be overridden by setting the MAILRC environment variable
 +     /​tmp/​R* ​                         temporary files
 +     /​usr/​share/​bsd-mailx/​mail.*help ​ help files
 +     /​etc/​mail.rc ​                    ​system initialization file
 +
 +EXIT STATUS
 +     The mail utility exits 0 on success, and >0 if an error occurs.
 +
 +SEE ALSO
 +     ​fmt(1),​ newaliases(1),​ vacation(1),​ aliases(5), mailaddr(7),​ mail.local(8),​ newaliases(8),​ sendmail(8),​ smtpd(8)
 +
 +STANDARDS
 +     The mailx utility is compliant with the IEEE Std 1003.1-2008 (“POSIX.1”) specification.
 +
 +     The flags [-iNnu] are marked by IEEE Std 1003.1-2008 (“POSIX.1”) as being optional.
 +
 +     The flags [-eFH] are marked by IEEE Std 1003.1-2008 (“POSIX.1”) as being optional, and are not supported by this implementation of
 +     ​mailx.
 +
 +     The flags [-abcdEIv] are extensions to the specification.
 +
 +HISTORY
 +     A mail command appeared in Version 3 AT&T UNIX.  This man page is derived from the Mail Reference Manual originally written by Kurt
 +     ​Shoens.
 +
 +BUGS
 +     ​Usually,​ Mail and mailx are just links to mail, which can be confusing.
 +
 +BSD                                                         ​December 22, 2015                                                        BSD
 +
 +</​code>​
  
  • man_de_mail.txt
  • Dernière modification: 2016/03/30 15:33
  • (modification externe)