[[man_de_htop]]

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man_de_htop [2016/03/30 15:33] (Version actuelle)
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 +==== Manuel de la commande "​htop"​ ====
 +
 +<​code>​
 +HTOP(1) ​                                                          ​Utils ​                                                         HTOP(1)
 +
 +
 +
 +NAME
 +       htop - interactive process viewer
 +
 +SYNOPSIS
 +       htop [-dChusv]
 +
 +DESCRIPTION
 +       Htop is a free (GPL) ncurses-based process viewer for Linux.
 +
 +       ​It ​ is similar to top, but allows you to scroll vertically and horizontally,​ so you can see all the processes running on the sys‐
 +       tem, along with their full command lines.
 +
 +       Tasks related to processes (killing, renicing) can be done without entering their PIDs.
 +
 +COMMAND-LINE OPTIONS
 +       ​Mandatory arguments to long options are mandatory for short options too.
 +
 +       -d --delay=DELAY
 +              Delay between updates, in tenths of seconds
 +
 +       -C --no-color --no-colour
 +              Start htop in monochrome mode
 +
 +       -h --help
 +              Display a help message and exit
 +
 +       -p --pid=PID,​PID...
 +              Show only the given PIDs
 +
 +       -s --sort-key COLUMN
 +              Sort by this column (use --sort-key help for a column list)
 +
 +       -u --user=USERNAME
 +              Show only the processes of a given user
 +
 +       -v --version
 +              Output version information and exit
 +
 +INTERACTIVE COMMANDS
 +       The following commands are supported while in htop:
 +
 +       ​Arrows,​ PgUP, PgDn, Home, End
 +            Scroll the process list.
 +
 +       Space
 +            Tag or untag a process. Commands that can operate on multiple processes, like "​kill",​ will  then  apply  over  the  list  of
 +            tagged processes, instead of the currently highlighted one.
 +
 +       ​U ​   Untag all processes (remove all tags added with the Space key).
 +
 +       ​s ​   Trace  process ​ system calls: if strace(1) is installed, pressing this key will attach it to the currently selected process,
 +            presenting a live update of system calls issued by the process.
 +
 +       ​l ​   Display open files for a process: if lsof(1) is installed, pressing this key will  display ​ the  list  of  file  descriptors
 +            opened by the process.
 +
 +       ​L ​   Trace  process library calls: if ltrace(1) is installed, pressing this key will attach it to the currently selected process,
 +            presenting a live update of library calls issued by the process.
 +
 +       F1, h, ?
 +            Go to the help screen
 +
 +       F2, S
 +            Go to the setup screen, where you can configure the meters displayed at the top of the screen, set various display ​ options,
 +            choose among color schemes, and select which columns are displayed, in which order.
 +
 +       F3, /
 +            Incrementally ​ search ​ the  command ​ lines of all the displayed processes. The currently selected (highlighted) command will
 +            update as you type. While in search mode, pressing F3 will cycle through matching occurrences.
 +
 +       F4, \
 +            Incremental process filtering: type in part of a process command line and only processes whose names match will be shown. To
 +            cancel filtering, enter the Filter option again and press Esc.
 +
 +       F5, t
 +            Tree  view:  organize processes by parenthood, and layout the relations between them as a tree. Toggling the key will switch
 +            between tree and your previously selected sort view. Selecting a sort view will exit tree view.
 +
 +       ​F6 ​  On sorted view, select a field for sorting, also accessible through < and >.  The current sort field is indicated by a high‐
 +            light  in the header. ​ On tree view, expand or collapse the current subtree. A "​+"​ indicator in the tree node indicates that
 +            it is collapsed.
 +
 +       F7, ]
 +            Increase the selected process'​s priority (subtract from '​nice'​ value). ​ This can only be done by the superuser.
 +
 +       F8, [
 +            Decrease the selected process'​s priority (add to '​nice'​ value)
 +
 +       F9, k
 +            "​Kill"​ process: sends a signal which is selected in a menu, to one or a group of processes. If processes were tagged, ​ sends
 +            the signal to all tagged processes. ​ If none is tagged, sends to the currently selected process.
 +
 +       F10, q
 +            Quit
 +
 +       ​I ​   Invert the sort order: if sort order is increasing, switch to decreasing, and vice-versa.
 +
 +       +, - When  in tree view mode, expand or collapse subtree. When a subtree is collapsed a "​+"​ sign shows to the left of the process
 +            name.
 +
 +       a (on multiprocessor machines)
 +            Set CPU affinity: mark which CPUs a process is allowed to use.
 +
 +       ​u ​   Show only processes owned by a specified user.
 +
 +       ​M ​   Sort by memory usage (top compatibility key).
 +
 +       ​P ​   Sort by processor usage (top compatibility key).
 +
 +       ​T ​   Sort by time (top compatibility key).
 +
 +       ​F ​   "​Follow"​ process: if the sort order causes the currently selected process to move in the list, make the selection bar follow
 +            it.  This is useful for monitoring a process: this way, you can keep a process always visible on screen. When a movement key
 +            is used, "​follow"​ loses effect.
 +
 +       ​K ​   Hide kernel threads: prevent the threads belonging the kernel to be displayed in the process list. (This is a toggle key.)
 +
 +       ​H ​   Hide user threads: on systems that represent them differently than ordinary processes (such as recent ​ NPTL-based ​ systems),
 +            this can hide threads from userspace processes in the process list. (This is a toggle key.)
 +
 +       ​Ctrl-L
 +            Refresh: redraw screen and recalculate values.
 +
 +       ​Numbers
 +            PID search: type in process ID and the selection highlight will be moved to it.
 +
 +
 +COLUMNS
 +       ​The ​ following columns can display data about each process. A value of '​-'​ in all the rows indicates that a column is unsupported
 +       on your system, or currently unimplemented in htop. The names below are the ones used in the "​Available Columns"​ section ​ of  the
 +       setup screen. If a different name is shown in htop's main screen, it is shown below in parenthesis.
 +
 +       ​Command
 +            The full command line of the process (i.e program name and arguments).
 +
 +       ​PID ​ The process ID.
 +
 +       PPID The parent process ID.
 +
 +       PGRP The process'​s group ID.
 +
 +       ​SESSION (SESN)
 +            The process'​s session ID.
 +
 +       ​TTY_NR (TTY)
 +            The controlling terminal of the process.
 +
 +       TPGID
 +            The process ID of the foreground process group of the controlling terminal.
 +
 +       STATE (S)
 +            The state of the process:
 +               S for sleeping (idle)
 +               R for running
 +               D for disk sleep (uninterruptible)
 +               Z for zombie (waiting for parent to read its exit status)
 +               T for traced or suspended (e.g by SIGTSTP)
 +               W for paging
 +
 +       ​PROCESSOR (CPU)
 +            The ID of the CPU the process last executed on.
 +
 +       NLWP The number of threads in the process.
 +
 +       NICE (NI)
 +            The  nice  value  of a process, from 19 (low priority) to -20 (high priority). A high value means the process is being nice,
 +            letting others have a higher relative priority. Only root can lower the value.
 +
 +       ​PERCENT_CPU (CPU%)
 +            The percentage of the CPU time that the process is currently using.
 +
 +       UTIME (UTIME+)
 +            The user CPU time, which is the amount of time the process has spent executing on the CPU in user mode (i.e  everything ​ but
 +            system calls), measured in clock ticks.
 +
 +       STIME (STIME+)
 +            The  system CPU time, which is the amount of time the kernel has spent executing system calls on behalf of the process, mea‐
 +            sured in clock ticks.
 +
 +       TIME (TIME+)
 +            The time, measured in clock ticks that the process has spent in user and system time (see UTIME, STIME above).
 +
 +       ​CUTIME
 +            The children'​s user CPU time, which is the amount of time the process'​s waited-for children have  spent  executing ​ in  user
 +            mode (see UTIME above).
 +
 +       ​CSTIME
 +            The children'​s system CPU time, which is the amount of time the kernel has spent executing system calls on behalf of all the
 +            process'​s waited-for children (see STIME above).
 +
 +       ​PRIORITY (PRI)
 +            The kernel'​s internal priority for the process, usually just its nice value plus twenty. Different for real-time processes.
 +
 +       ​PERCENT_MEM
 +            The percentage of memory the process is currently using (based on the process'​s resident memory size, see M_RESIDENT below).
 +
 +       ​M_SIZE (VIRT)
 +            Size in memory of the total program size.
 +
 +       ​M_RESIDENT (RES)
 +            The resident set size, i.e the size of the text and data sections, plus stack usage.
 +
 +       ​M_SHARE (SHR)
 +            The size of the process'​s shared pages
 +
 +       M_TRS (CODE)
 +            The size of the text segment of the process (i.e the size of the processes executable instructions).
 +
 +       M_LRS (LIB)
 +            The library size of the process.
 +
 +       M_DRS (DATA)
 +            The size of the data segment plus stack usage of the process.
 +
 +       M_DT (DIRTY)
 +            The size of the dirty pages of the process.
 +
 +       ​ST_UID (UID)
 +            The user ID of the process owner.
 +
 +       USER The username of the process owner, or the user ID if the name can't be determined.
 +
 +       ​STARTTIME
 +            The time the process was started.
 +
 +       RCHAR (RD_CHAR)
 +            The number of bytes the process has read.
 +
 +       WCHAR (WR_CHAR)
 +            The number of bytes the process has written.
 +
 +       SYSCR (RD_SYSC)
 +            The number of read(2) syscalls for the process.
 +
 +       SYSCW (WR_SYSC)
 +            The number of write(2) syscalls for the process.
 +
 +       ​RBYTES (IO_RBYTES)
 +            Bytes of read(2) I/O for the process.
 +
 +       ​WBYTES (IO_WBYTES)
 +            Bytes of write(2) I/O for the process.
 +
 +       ​IO_READ_RATE (IORR)
 +            The I/O rate of read(2) in bytes per second, for the process.
 +
 +       ​IO_WRITE_RATE (IOWR)
 +            The I/O rate of write(2) in bytes per second, for the process.
 +
 +       ​IO_RATE (IO)
 +            The I/O rate, IO_READ_RATE + IO_WRITE_RATE (see above).
 +
 +       ​CNCLWB (IO_CANCEL)
 +            Bytes of cancelled write(2) I/O.
 +
 +       ​CGROUP
 +            Which cgroup the process is in.
 +
 +       CTID OpenVZ container ID, a.k.a virtual environment ID.
 +
 +       VPID OpenVZ process ID.
 +
 +       VXID VServer process ID.
 +
 +       ​OOM ​ OOM killer score.
 +
 +       All other flags
 +            Currently unsupported (always displays '​-'​).
 +
 +
 +SEE ALSO
 +       ​proc(5),​ top(1), free(1), ps(1), uptime(1)
 +
 +
 +AUTHORS
 +       htop is developed by Hisham Muhammad <​hisham@gobolinux.org>​.
 +
 +       This man page was written by Bartosz Fenski <​fenio@o2.pl>​ for the Debian GNU/Linux distribution (but it may be used  by  others).
 +       It was updated by Hisham Muhammad, and later by Vincent Launchbury, who wrote the '​Columns'​ section.
 +
 +
 +
 +htop 1.0.3                                                        2011                                                           ​HTOP(1)
 +
 +</​code>​
  
  • man_de_htop.txt
  • Dernière modification: 2016/03/30 15:33
  • (modification externe)